67 / 54
      58 / 54
      65 / 47

      Half of Texas registered voters support Arizona-Style Immigration for the Lone Star State

      One poll said more than half of registered Texas voters wouldn't mind having a similar immigration law to that of Arizona here in the lone star state.

      "Laws like SB 1070 are injustices no matter how many people support them," said John-Michael Torres with LUPE.

      La Union Del Pueblo Entero has been outspokenly against the Arizona immigration law since the beginning.

      "Laws can't be passed that limit people's ability to find work to seek work to associate with others," said Torres.

      Under the law, police are allowed to question people's legal status.

      Those against the law say officials can abuse their power and racially profile.

      Those in favor of the law say it cracks down on illegal immigration something the majority of those polled in a telephone survey seem to agree with.

      Out of just over 1 thousand registered Texas voters, 53 percent of them said they would support the passage of an Arizona-style immigration bill here in Texas.

      "Polls and referendums can't be deciding factors on issues of human life," said Torres.

      Some republican lawmakers are already are already introducing similar bills for this legislative session.

      "It doesn't surprise me that 50 percent of the citizen voters of the state are in favor of some sort of form of legislation to protect our borders and rightfully so," said Hollis Rutledge, past chairman of the Hidalgo County Republican Party.

      He said because the government at the federal level didn't take care of the immigration problem, Arizona took matters into their own hands.

      "It's unfortunate that it's gotten to this point simply because out of desperation," he said. "They were not listened to."

      He said it's possible that could happen here in Texas.

      "If we still don't get any results, then I think it's going to be necessary for the state legislators to look at this very issue in the upcoming bi-annual session," said Rutledge.

      But he said legislators need to be very careful on how they approach developing a state immigration law, so that it doesn't discourage those that come here from our neighboring country to legitimately do business with the United States.