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      CASA in need of caring volunteers

      Linda Rosevelt has worked with 13 children during her three-and-a-half years as a CASA volunteer.

      She admits her first case was a little scary because she didn't know what to expect from the teen she would be advocating for, but now she enjoys being a constant presence in children's lives.

      "The hardest thing is getting them to trust you, because every adult in their life has disappointed them over and over and over and over and you're just another one," Rosevelt said.

      But treating these children with respect, listening and keeping her word, has been effective in working with foster children who have been removed from unsafe or abusive homes.

      She said the payback is the "love.

      They always tell me they love me," she added.

      It's people like Rosevelt who truly care about children for the right reasons, that CASA is looking for.

      Executive director Richard Alaniz says right now there are 60 sworn in advocates but because of different factors including stress and economic hardships, child neglect and abuse cases are on the rise in the valley - and more advocates are needed

      "If people feel that they are going to assist the child in this type of situation we ask that people do it for the right reasons, that they step-up and give of their time," Alaniz said.

      Rosevelt said she too had a rough childhood and that's why she stepped up to the plate and said all is takes is caring.

      The Historic Brownsville Museum and the Consulado de Mexico present Snapshots in Time to benefit CASA.

      The exhibit will feature a special collection of 19th century postcards which capture moments in time along the border community.

      Thursday July 31, 2014641 E.