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Consequences of making school threats

District Judge Mario Ramírez in Hidalgo County says that Texas law covers threats in several ways.

School threats seem like a daily occurrence this week.

On Friday, San Juan police arrested and charged a student accused of making a threat towards his classmates at a PSJA high school.

Joe Castro López, 17, was charged with terroristic threat with intent to commit possible bodily injury.

"This is a very serious charge," San Juan Municipal Judge Eloy Hernández said during Castro’s hearing. "You could be facing anywhere from two up to ten years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine."

District Judge Mario Ramírez in Hidalgo County says that Texas law covers threats in several ways. But the most recent threats made by teens towards their schools have mostly been misdemeanors and handled in juvenile court.

"Children can even be tried as adults under certain circumstances," Ramírez said. “A judge has to make a finding of the maturity of the child, the severity of the offense."

Ramírez says usually a child can be tried as an adult for violent and physical offenses.

To report any threats, call your local authorities.

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