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      Creep turns cyber-stalker, what TMs next?

      Jessica Bella spends a majority of her day online.

      The single mother runs an athletic apparel business out of her home and manages several social media sites for clients in the valley.

      So in 2006, when she received a friend request from a man she didn't know, she added him because she wanted to get her business name out to as many people as possible.

      But what she didn't expect was that the man would start harassing her over several years and followed her from myspace to facebook.

      Jessica says as soon as his messages became annoying, especially alarming, she blocked the man who claimed he was from the valley. But soon after, he created a new page to get to her from and the cycle continued until she had finally blocked all of his Facebook pages.

      She hadn't thought of the man again until she realized he was doing the same thing to several other women in the McAllen area and they started sharing their experiences with the cyberstalker.

      But his antics are no joke. The alleged cyberstalker gets extremely angry when things don't go his way or when the female he is trying to get to know doesn't respond.

      It took years for Jessica to get him to stop bothering her, but she fears he is going to continue doing this to more women.

      And what happens when he gets past the online conversations and meets anyone of them in person?

      She says she's speaking up about the dangers of online predators and hopes law enforcement will take a bigger role in protecting people from them.

      We are not mentioning the man's facebook name because he has not been arrested or charged.

      Action 4 News contacted McAllen police and they say police reports must be made and there has to be evidence that the quote cyberstalker is a viable threat in order for them to be charged.

      Some advice police pass along is to use all security measures online and if you don't know the person, don't add them.

      According to state law, a person commits an offense if they send repeated electronic communications in a manner likely to harass, annoy, alarm, abuse, torment, embarrass, or offend another.