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      High school migrant students get full rides to college

      Maurico Cervantes and Kenya Salinas received full scholarships

      Two migrant students at Robert Vela High School are given the opportunity of a lifetime-a free college education.

      "Having this opportunity it means the world to me 'cause now I can actually pay for college," said Maurico Cervantes.

      He and Kenya Salinas are migrants students at Robert Vela High School in Edinburg.

      The students have traveled with their families to different parts of the U.S. to look for work, most of which paying just minimum wage. Both said they wouldn't be able to afford college without extra financial help.

      However, money will no longer be an obstacle for these two college bound seniors. Both with the help of the school's migrant program have received a scholarship.

      It's a real dream come true for Salina's family, she says her mother worked hard so that she could focus on her studies.

      "Seeing her do everything she can for us is just heartwarming...I'm going to do this for her because she did this for me," said Salinas.

      The scholarships will cover everything from Cervantes and Salinas's four year tuition to their housing and books.

      "When you graduate, people think that's the beginining of what your going to do for the rest of your life and having everything paid for-that opportunity is so great. It helps me know I'm going to be okay and I can do what I want to do," said Salinas.

      Salinas said she wants to go into the medical field and she can't wait to start her coursework at St. Edwards University this fall. Cervantes is headed to Michigan State University and wants to major in business.School officials said that's the best part of the job, getting to see their students succeed.

      "I think thats the highlight of our careers to be able to see kids like this that move forward and accomplish the dream of a lifetime," said Robert Vela High School Principal Eva Torres.

      Monday afternoon, both Cervantes and Salinas signed their letter of intent for the universities of their choosing.