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      Tire recycling plant owner said Alton fire could have been prevented

      A Google earth map shows and aerial shot of the tires that burned on Moorefield Road near Alton on Monday.

      The map shows tens of thousands of tires all stacked on top of the other.

      These tires were located in the center of the massive grassfire.

      It took 11 fire crews from across the Valley hours to get that fire under control.

      "Tire fires produce so much heat that water itself will be hard to contain that fire," McAllen Firefighter Rene Alaniz said.

      He said when tires start to burn they are very hard to put out. He said they had to use a special type of foam to get the flames under control.

      With illegally dumped tires strewn across the Rio Grande Valley and dry conditions at an all time high, there is a potential these tires could fuel another grassfire.

      Elva Walker said she and her husband saw the need for a place that would take used tires off of people TMs hands and dispose of them properly.

      "I think it's something the Valley and South Texas needed," Walker said.

      After three years, Walker was able to acquire the permits to get started. In December they opened up Santa Anita Reclamation Tire Disposal in Linn, Texas.

      The property their business sits on used to be a giant caliche pit. Walker said as they slowly reclaim the land, using shredded tires, the giant holes will soon be filled and the land ready to be used.

      Walker said the process is simple and quick. She said the used tires are put into a shredder and then buried in the giant pits.

      Despite having this business, Walker said they do still have to follow some rules when it comes to burying the rubber.

      "It has to be 50 percent shred and 50 percent soil, Walker said. The last 18 inches has to be pure top soil."

      Walker said they then pack the area where the tires were buried and make sure there are no air pockets that will allow the tires to surface again. She said they charge five cents per pound.

      She said a regular passenger vehicle tire would cost someone a dollar to dispose at their sight.