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      Valley abortion doctor explains procedure

      Dr. Dana Kusnir is not hiding her face, in fact, she's offering up information about an act that is usually only talked about in whispers or on the other hand loud yells from those who oppose it.

      "We basically use a series of dialater rods and then we use a suction to gently remove the contents of the uterus."

      Kusnir performs abortions at the Whole Women's Health Clinic in McAllen which is a private facility in order to make women comfortable, but the anti-abortion clinic next door and protestors make sure it is known what happens here.

      That doesn't bother the young doctor.

      "This is why I went to medical school. I was a patient advocate at first in Ohio and I figured out how important it was to provide procedures."

      She sees patients in the valley from all walks of life.

      "It is really a remarkable range, abortion transcends race and age."

      And as the law stands, Kusnir is already under strict guidelines and fears for her patients if they become more stringent.

      "They are very brave, all of my patients."

      "In desperate times, women will do desperate things," says Andrea Ferrigno.

      Ferrigno is an administrator for the organization which opened their doors to the public this week to let people see the facility and rooms where the abortions are performed. She wants to lift the dark veil which has been cast over these clinics which could disappear if Texas legislators say so.

      "That would mean that women and their families in the valley would have to travel outside of the area to seek abortion services."

      Dr. Kusnir realizes she may soon be without a job in the valley if the law passes but says her concerns are with the women who won't have a place to turn.

      "It's always struck me as one of the most important rights that a woman can have."