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      Valley groups rallying against state education budget cuts

      With a $27 billion dollar budget deficit, Texas organizations are standing up for teachers' jobs.

      Some rallying outside a local school to shed light on their concerns as part of "Save Our State" week.

      Across Texas, demonstrators are rallying in front of schools to call attention to the education cuts.

      "We are suffering a lot here in the Valley because of the budget cuts," said Ashley Estevan with Texas Organizing Project (TOP).

      They are calling on legislators to save schools by dipping into the rainy day fund.

      Demonstrators used umbrellas to symbolize the rainy day fund. They said it's time to tap into it.

      Estevan is a college student, and she's afraid cuts to the federally-funded Pell Grant will affect students and keep them from graduating.

      "It's just worrisome because that is our money," she said. "That is what's going to help us become educated and to hear that it's being cut is scary."

      She isn't just watching from the sidelines. She's actively protesting the cuts with her fellow TOP members.

      "We all need to come together," she said. "This is for Texas. This is for our schools for us."

      The group ARISE, A Resource in Serving Equality, fights for bringing equality and opportunity to immigrants in the community and they said with all the cuts to education, opportunities will be limited for children in schools.

      "We don't need cuts because it will hurt our kids, teachers and everybody in the school system," said Ramona Casas, with ARISE.

      Schools in the Valley are preparing for anywhere from $8 to $11 billion dollars in cuts to public education.

      Some have given staff the opportunity to voluntarily resign. Others are working in the dark to cut down their electiricity bill, and districts continue to look at ways they can trim their costs.

      Demonstrators said it's not looking good.

      "Help us help our students help the Valley," said Estevan.

      It's a plea, they hope legislators will hear.