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      Woman attempts to impersonate niece on scam call for thousands of dollars

      A Brownsville man says he was almost scammed out of thousands of dollars

      A Brownsville man says he was almost scammed out of thousands of dollars.

      Four years ago, he got a call from someone claiming to be his nephew.

      However, he didn TMt fall from it because before he handed over the cash, he called his nephew who assured him he didn TMt make that call.

      This time it was a female caller from an area code in Guadalajara.

      The man who fears these callers are someone linked to criminal activity wants his identity hidden, but he said the female caller was friendly and told him she was his niece.

      That was the first red flag since he doesn't have a niece.

      She refused to give him her name and asked him to guess.

      She claimed she was detained by airport security and needed $2,000 to get out. "The man says when I got back on my caller ID they had called over 40 times so you can see how persistent they are. The point being that they are so persistent that this has worked on other people and it may not work maybe 20 times in a row but it only takes one per day. To make easy money."

      The FBI suggests that you buy time by telling them your battery is dying.

      During that time, investigate call the person they claim to be if that person does exist.

      Also, don't hesitate to call law enforcement.

      They may help you from losing money to a scam the FBI said exploits the fears of many in the valley who have relatives and loved ones living in Mexico.

      If you have any doubt whether a call is a legitimate kidnapping, don't hesitate to call law enforcement. We have dealt with these situations and know how to increase the chances of recovering victims safely. We may also help you avoid losing a lot of money to a scam that exploits the fears of many in the RGV who have relatives and loved ones living in or near Mexico.

      Below is a statement sent by the FBI on how to deal with these extortionists:

      Tell them it TMs a bad connection, your battery is dying, you need your hearing aid whatever it takes to buy time.

      Investigate! Try to locate the alleged victim. Call the victims, relatives, friends, neighbors, etc.

      To check out the story.

      Chances are you will find them and they will be safe. Demand proof of life.

      Those who are involved in kidnapping know they must demonstrate they have custody of the victim.

      The victim's voice may not be true proof. A photo of victim with the daily newspaper is more reliable.

      Talk to your family members in advance and discuss what you will do in the event of a kidnapping; develop code words, one meaning I'm OK, take your time to work through this, the other meaning its very dire, do whatever you can to get me out.

      If you have any doubt whether a call is a legitimate kidnapping, don't hesitate to call law enforcement.

      We have dealt with these situations and know how to increase the chances of recovering victims safely.

      We may also help you avoid losing a lot of money to a scam that exploits the fears of many in the RGV who have relatives and loved ones living in or near Mexico.

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