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      Former Marine crosses into Mexico, never to be heard from again

      Witnesses say a former U.S. Marine, his father and his uncle were taken by armed men in Mexico.

      Former marine Armando Torres has been missing for around 11 days.

      He crossed the Los Indios bridge in a Jeep on Tuesday, May 14th and has not returned home.

      According to the family, the Marine was on his way to visit his father in La Barranca, Tamaulipas.

      Torres rarely risked crossing the border.

      A phone message was spine-chilling proof that the former U.S. Marine, his father and uncle were kidnapped by force.

      "They took him, you don TMt know if he's dead. That means there TMs still hope he's alive," a family member who chose to remain anonymous said.

      Uniforms once used by Torres were draped in his bedroom as a bleak reminder that he once served in the armed forces.

      Torres did not know he would have to battle for his life outside the armed forces as he made the decision to cross into Mexico.

      The family hypothesizes that cartel members wanted a piece of land owned by the former marine's relatives.

      Family members immediately contacted FBI, police and the Mexican Consulate.

      Since the family has contacted the FBI, they have released little to no information.

      "I don TMt want to lose that hope that he is still alive but at the same time it is a big reality," the woman said.

      They had signs of life four or five days ago but they kind of lost that trail, she added.

      Family members said the abductors have not asked contacted them demanding U.S. currency.

      They are turning to the media in hopes to broaden their search for family members they have not seen in nearly two weeks.

      "We want to bring it to Mexico TMs attention. This is a Marine here on this side, that TMs a war hero," the anonymous woman said.

      Mexico Interior Ministry reported that over 26,000 people have gone missing over the past six years.

      Mexican authorities currently do not have data regarding how many disappearances are connected with organized crime.

      "They're telling you there are no signs of life, but at the same time their bodies would have come up already," the family member who is holding out hope said.

      The Torres family wants to know if their family members are dead or alive during this pressing time.