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      Former Israeli soldier compares Hamas to drug cartels

      Eli Mazoz is keeping a close eye on the conflict in Gaza.

      As the conflict in Gaza continues, Jews in the Rio Grande Valley are praying for peace.

      Violence and war is nothing new to the Gaza strip, but criticism of Israel TMs military strikes is growing, and it has Jews in the valley concerned history may repeat itself if the truth isn't told.

      Eli Mazoz and Edinburg Rabbi Asher are keeping a close eye on the conflict in Gaza.

      Mazoz's brother is currently serving in the Israeli army.

      With no end to the violence in sight, Mazoz fears for his brother's life.

      "They won't stop. We aren't fighting against a country. We don't fight against an army; we fight against a terror organization, Mazoz said.

      He says it's no different from what's happening on the other side of the Rio Grande.

      "It's the same thing like the cartels in Mexico. They won't stop. How? You going to explain to them how many people died? They don't care, Mazoz said.

      Criticism has grown among the international community as Israel fires back against Hamas forces in the Gaza strip.

      Mazoz blames the criticism on the Qatar based Al Jazeera media network.

      "When they show you innocent people getting hurt, they don't show you that two minutes before the building was bombed, they shot 60 rockets from this building and the second they finish shooting they put kids on the roof, Mazoz said. "They don't care who gets hurt. They don't play by the rules. They shoot from the roof and go back in the tunnels to hide."

      While many say intolerance for the other's beliefs is the root of the conflict, Muslims and Jews have learned to live in peace inside Israel.

      "There are a lot of Muslims in Israel, we live in peace. We go to eat at their restaurants, they come to ours. We cheer for the same soccer team, we live in peace, Mazoz said.

      Like his brother, Mazoz served in Israel TMs military, but he does not want war.

      "We have no reason to go to war, nothing changed 10 years ago when I was a soldier and nothing is going to change 10 years from now because we believe in peace, we want peace, Mazoz said.Hamas leaders deny financial backing from any state, but claim the money needed to fight this war comes from individual supporters from throughout the Arab world.

      As long as they have money in their pockets, Mazoz believes the conflict will continue.