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Dozens of asylum seekers at Hidalgo International Bridge

Dozens of migrants are awaiting their turn to be taken by the Department of Homeland Security in hopes of entering the country after feeling their own.

Dozens of migrants are awaiting their turn to be taken by the Department of Homeland Security in hopes of entering the country after fleeing their own.

Victoria Rodriguez has traveled over 1,600 miles from her small city in Honduras to get the United States for asylum; little did she know she would have to wait more than five days—and counting— to enter.

Each day, more and more migrants line up along the U.S.-Mexico border at the International Crossing Bridge in Hidalgo, Texas, in hopes of fleeing from the dangers of their countries.

“It’s scary, it’s so much poverty and no opportunities to get jobs or go to school,” said Rodriguez, who left her country 23 days ago with her 8-year-old son.

“The violence in my country is horrible, there are so many problems and the children are used to smuggle drugs and they get caught up in that life and I did not want that for my son,” said Rodriguez, as she hugged her son.

Rodriguez left her other son behind with his father in her country.

With the temperatures hitting triple digits, Rodriguez and the other migrants are struggling to stay hydrated.

She tells CBS 4 News that they only eat when volunteers stop by and drop off snacks and water.

“We’re grateful,” said Rodriguez. “There are good people here and they come and drop off food, wipes because you know we can’t shower.”

With no running water, the asylum seekers rely on bars of soap and rinsing themselves with bottled water, or the water fountains along the bridge.

They sleep on cardboard and concrete.

Some have been gifted blankets and pillows from volunteers.

A store located across the bridge lets them use their restroom, but they shut down at 8 p.m.

“So, if we want to go after 8 p.m. until 8 a.m., then there’s no way we can go," said Rodriguez. "If we get sick from our stomach because it’s hot and we get dehydrated, we have to hold it in.”

Rodriguez said the process won't shake her faith as one day she’ll be able to cross into the United States of America.

“I don’t know how long it will take, but I have God and he never leaves our side," said Rodriguez. "I have faith they will let us in. I hope.”

CBS 4 News reached out to U.S Customs and Border Protection, which says they will accommodate the migrants to be processed as resources and detention holding facilities become available.

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