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President Trump threatens to shut down US-Mexico border as migrant caravan nears

As thousands of migrants from Honduras traveling through a caravan are inching closer and closer to American soil, President Donald Trump is threatening to shut down our border.

As thousands of migrants from Honduras traveling through a caravan are inching closer and closer to American soil, President Donald Trump is threatening to shut down our border.

If President Trump gets his way, soon the border could close after he threatened to call up the military to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border.

Elma Ramos crosses the border every day and says it'll be impossible to shut it down.

"He's not gonna be able to do that, there ain't no way," said Ram "They're [the migrants] asking for help, they don't have that help in Mexico," said Ramos.

Nearly all of the migrants say they're leaving Honduras for fear of being killed if they stay in their home country.

"Lo asemos por miedo," said one migrant on the Reynosa-Mcallen International Bridge seeking asylum.

Thursday, President Trump tweeted threatening to stop the not yet signed trade deal with Mexico if the caravan isn't stopped.

If Trump's shut down plan is approved, this could impact the economy greatly.

"Just shutting down the border for any length of time is millions of dollars and millions of pesos and it's ludicrous," said Luis Munoz, a U.S. citizen who walks across the border every day. "Especially because the caravan isn't going to stop anyway. The reality is that if the Americans had that same problem and they were trying to go to Canada to relieve it, they would and if someone was trying to kill them, they're not gonna wait for a VISA or anything else, they'll just go take care of it."

Others worry about how this will affect those who live, work and study across the border.

"My kids cross every day to go to school," said Felipe Martinez who lives in Mexico, but walks the border every day to send his kids to school in the United States. Martinez fears the shut down would affect his children's education.

There are currently hundreds of U.S. National Guardsmen here at the Rio Grande Valley stationed in various cities, like Roma and Weslaco.

It's unclear if more troops would arrive or what day, if any, they would be sent to the border.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is scheduled to meet with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto.

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